Latest Tweets:

"Not a single one of the cells that compose you knows who you are, or cares."

Daniel Dennett

(via scienceisbeauty)

"I always start with the things

I know the least about,

and then go back to things

where I feel confident.”

Monolake: Sound scientist

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Two jets of sugar syrup collide and interact to form very different patterns.  On the left, the two jets have a low flow rate and create a chain-like wake.  The jets on the right have a higher flow rate and produce a liquid sheet that breaks down into filaments and droplets. The result is often likened to fish bones. (Photo credit: Rebecca Ing)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Two jets of sugar syrup collide and interact to form very different patterns.  On the left, the two jets have a low flow rate and create a chain-like wake.  The jets on the right have a higher flow rate and produce a liquid sheet that breaks down into filaments and droplets. The result is often likened to fish bones. (Photo credit: Rebecca Ing)

(via fuckyeahartandscience)

"Its portrayal of science is one-dimensional and disconnected: it fails to capture debate and the nature of progress in science; and it fails to appreciate the connection between science and our daily lives, between empirical research and the political questions of the day."

The BBC’s problem with science

Arc: a new magazine about the future from the makers of New Scientist

arcfinity:


“Arc is an experiment in how we talk about the future,”

“Writers have seized the opportunity to showcase their thoughts, their dreams, their anxieties and their opinions about our future.”
 

Looking forward to first issue in February featuring Bruce Sterling:

“Visionaries, prophets and seers are common to all mankind,” says Bruce Sterling, “but only societies with science can breed futurists.”

*23


“A little more than two weeks ago, Ghonim settled into his regular three-hour flight from Dubai to Cairo. His seatmate, an older Egyptian executive type, recognized him immediately and started right in. ‘Isn’t enough enough?’ the man asked. ‘What are you doing to this country?’ The executive turned out to be an engineering consultant whom Ghonim pegged at around 50; he might have been Ghonim himself born twenty years earlier. Ghonim is both an interested listener and not great at getting out of conversations, and so he spent the flight absorbing his seatmate’s story: The older man had supported the protests at Tahrir Square and experienced ‘the epitome of happiness’ when Mubarak had been forced down on February 11. But as the revolution had barreled on, some of its demands seemingly extreme, and the country continued to falter, the consultant had come to resent all of it.

“The Lonely Battle of Wael Ghonim.” — Benjamin Wallace-Wells, New York magazine

“A little more than two weeks ago, Ghonim settled into his regular three-hour flight from Dubai to Cairo. His seatmate, an older Egyptian executive type, recognized him immediately and started right in. ‘Isn’t enough enough?’ the man asked. ‘What are you doing to this country?’ The executive turned out to be an engineering consultant whom Ghonim pegged at around 50; he might have been Ghonim himself born twenty years earlier. Ghonim is both an interested listener and not great at getting out of conversations, and so he spent the flight absorbing his seatmate’s story: The older man had supported the protests at Tahrir Square and experienced ‘the epitome of happiness’ when Mubarak had been forced down on February 11. But as the revolution had barreled on, some of its demands seemingly extreme, and the country continued to falter, the consultant had come to resent all of it.

“The Lonely Battle of Wael Ghonim.” — Benjamin Wallace-Wells, New York magazine

(Source: longreads)